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How Not To Kill Your Guava Tree
INTRODUCTION
LOCATION AND PLANTING
WATERING
CARE AND FROST PROTECTION
FERTILIZING
SOIL
MAINTENANCE
SUN AND HEAT
FRUITS/HARVEST




INTRODUCTION

Guavas are primarily self-fruitful, although some strains seem to produce more fruit when cross-pollinated with another variety. Guavas can bloom throughout the year in mild-winter areas, but the heaviest bloom occurs with the onset of warm weather in the spring. The exact time can vary from year to year depending on weather. The chief pollinator of guavas is the honeybee.

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LOCATION AND PLANTING

Like other tender subtropicals, guavas need a frost-free location, but are not too fussy otherwise. They prefer full sun.

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WATERING

Guavas have survived dry summers with no water, although they do best with regular deep watering. The ground should be allowed to dry to a depth of several inches before watering again. Lack of moisture will delay bloom and cause the fruit to drop.

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CARE AND FROST PROTECTION

Overhead protection and planting on the warm side of a building or structure will often provide suitable frost protection for guavas in cooler areas. A frame over the plant covered with fabric will provide additional protection during freezes, and electric lights can be included for added warmth. Potted plants can be moved to a more protected site if necessary.

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FERTILIZING

Guavas are fast growers and heavy feeders, and benefit from regular applications of fertilizer. Mature trees may require as much as 1/2 pound actual nitrogen per year. Apply fertilizer monthly, just prior to heavy pruning.

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SOIL

The guava will tolerate many soil conditions, but will produce better in rich soils high in organic matter. They also prefer a well-drained soil in the pH range of 5 to 7. The tree will take temporary waterlogging but will not tolerate salty soils.

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MAINTENANCE

Shaping the tree and removing water shoots and suckers are usually all that is necessary. Guavas can take heavy pruning, however, and can be used as informal hedges or screens. Since the fruit is borne on new growth, pruning does not interfere with next years crop.

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SUN AND HEAT

Guavas actually thrive in both humid and dry climates, but can survive only a few degrees of frost. The tree will recover from a brief exposure to 29° F but may be completely defoliated. Young trees are particularly sensitive to cold spells. Older trees, killed to the ground, have sent up new shoots which fruited 2 years later. Guavas can take considerable neglect, withstanding temporary waterlogging and very high temperatures. They tend to bear fruit better in areas with a definite winter or cooler season.

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FRUITS/HARVEST

Guava fruits may be round, ovoid or pear-shaped, 2 - 4 inches long, and have 4 or 5 protruding floral remnants (sepals) at the apex. Varieties differ widely in flavor and seediness. The better varieties are soft when ripe, creamy in texture with a rind that softens to be fully edible. The flesh may be white, pink, yellow, or red. The sweet, musky odor is pungent and penetrating. The seeds are numerous but small and, in good varieties, fully edible. In warmer regions guavas will ripen all year. There is a distinctive change in the color and aroma of the guava that has ripened. For the best flavor, allow fruit to ripen on the tree. The can also be picked green-mature and allowed to ripen off the tree at room temperature. Placing the fruit in a brown paper bag with a banana or apple will hasten ripening. Mature green fruit can be stored for two to five weeks at temperature between 46° and 50° F and relative humidity of 85 to 95 percent. Fruit that has changed color cannot be stored for any extended periods. It bruises easily and will quickly deteriorate or rot.

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|Home Page| |CONTACT US| |Hours and Directions| | ONLINE STORE| |What We Sell| |WHAT'S NEW| |Fruits of Warm Climates| |High Density Planting| |Online Catalog| |Books| |About Our Nursery| |Internet Links/Sources| |Mission Statement| |FAQ| |Does It Grow In Arizona?| |Growing Sub-Tropicals| |FROST PROTECTION| |FREEZE DAMAGE CARE!!| |Growing Avocados| |Growing Bamboo| |Growing Bananas| |Growing Citrus Trees| |Growing Dragon Fruit| |Growing Guavas| |Growing Loquats| |Growing Mangos| |Growing Papayas| |Growing Passion Fruit| |Growing Plumeria| |Growing Figs| |Nursery Policy | |Welcome| |Summer Planting| |Site Map| |Hardiness Lookup Tool|